Tag : First Time Buyer

Interest Rates

Interest Rate Rise

Interest Rate Rise

In 2007 Bulgaria and Romania joined the European Union, Lewis Hamilton got his first drive in Formula 1 partnering with Fernando Alonso at McLaren, the final book in the Harry Potter series was published and England played their first match at the new Wembley Stadium.

It was also the year in which the Bank of England last raised interest rates, when they went up by 0.25%.

That all changed on 2 November 2017 when The Bank of England voted to raise UK interest rates for the first time in over a decade, to 0.5%.

So how could an interest rate rise of 0.25% affect you?
In the short term, both borrowers and savers could see a modest effect on finances. Savers are likely to be pleased with the welcome boost even if the increase is small. Borrowers however will be less pleased as they could see their mortgage repayments rise.

Impact on borrowers
Higher interest will mean that those on Standard Variable Rates (SVR) or Trackers Rates will see their mortgage repayments rise. On a mortgage of £125,000 an increase of 0.25% would result in payments increasing by £15 a month (£185 a year).

Those with larger mortgages will in turn see a larger payment increase. Those with a mortgage balance of £250,000 will see their monthly payments increased by £31 (£369 a year). However, the 57% of borrowers on a fixed rate deal will be unaffected during their fixed term.

These figures might not seem much in isolation, but borrowers should also be aware that higher interest rates could impact other borrowing, like credit cards, car credit or unsecured loans.

There’s also the prospect that rates could continue to rise over the long-term. If we hit 1%, the monthly repayments on a £125,000 mortgage would go up by £78.48, and £161.69 if the rate doubled to 2%.

If you’re concerned about the impact of higher interest rates on your mortgage repayments you may want to consider a fixed-rate deal, especially if you’re currently on SVR. Remember, if you’re already on a fixed-rate deal you may face higher repayments when the term ends. Make sure you diarise when that’s due to happen and get in touch so that we can discuss whether the best option is to remortgage.

Impact on savers
According to research there’s no standard savings account on the market that can outpace inflation, in fact the average easy-access savings account is currently paying 0.35% interest.

If the Bank of England increases the base rate savers may be able to find better returns to keep up with rising inflation. However, as with mortgages, those already on a fixed rate will not see higher rates until the term ends.

Whether you’re a saver or a borrower, we’d love to help you make more of your money. Get in touch to find out how.

Your home/property may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

Mortgages

Mortgage-savvy millennials

Mortgage-savvy millennials

When it comes to their mortgage, are younger people making better financial decisions than their older counterparts?

The term ‘millennial generation’ applies to people born somewhere between 1980 and 2000, a 20-year span which also saw a huge rise in property prices. At the start of 1980, the average house price was £22,677, but by the end of 2000 this had risen to £81,628. Today the figure stands at £209,971.

A recent study shows the dramatic rise in property prices means just one in five 25-year-olds can afford to buy a property, and the average age of a first-time buyer in the UK has been pushed up to 30. Despite the financial challenges, almost three quarters of UK millennials intend to buy their first home in the next five years.

Repayment vs interest-only
The millennials who’ve bucked the trend and already made the first rung of the housing ladder obviously prefer the concept of reducing their loan month by month, with the vast majority (92%) of 18-34 year olds choosing a repayment mortgage, compared with 68% of those aged 55 and over.

Fixed rate
Younger borrowers also seem to prefer to know what their mortgage repayments are going to be, with nearly 70% opting for a fixed-rate deal compared with 35% of their older counterparts. They also seem happy to shop around, with a quarter remortgaging to potentially reduce their monthly payments, whereas 82% of those aged 55 and over have stuck with the same mortgage.

Offset mortgages also appear to be more attractive to younger generations with one third of 18-34 year olds taking out an offset mortgage (where they will use their savings to either reduce the term or repayments on their mortgage) compared to just 11% of over 55s.

If there is a conclusion to be made from these statistics it could be that millennials are more savvy when it comes to their mortgage, but remember, interest rates have remained at record lows for nearly ten years; something that’s very much in their favour.

Figures correct as at September 2017

Whatever age you are, whether you’re looking to buy for the first time, remortgage or move up the housing ladder, please get in touch to see how we can find the right mortgage for you.

Your home/property may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

conveyancing

Do you know your credit rating?

Do you know your credit rating?

If you’re looking to take your first steps onto the housing ladder you may have sacrificed your takeaways and holidays to save the deposit and scoured hundreds of houses online. But have your checked your credit history?

Even if you’re remortgaging or moving up the housing ladder your credit history will be important.

What is a credit score?
A credit report includes details of your credit history including any credit you’ve applied for (like loans,
credit cards, and overdrafts), credit you’ve been given and how you’ve managed the repayments. Also included are your address details (current and previous), public records such as county court judgments and financial associates (someone who is financially linked to you eg. a joint mortgage or bank account).

All the details in your credit report are analysed to calculate your credit score. This score is used by
lenders as an indication of how you’ll manage and repay the money you borrow.

Scores on the doors
The general rule is the higher the score the better, and the more likely you’ll be accepted for a mortgage or other credit.

If you’re looking to take out a mortgage or remortgage, check your credit score regularly. You can usually get a simple overview for free and it pays to check with several different sources. Noddle, Equifax, ClearScore and Experian all offer a service to help you understand your rating.

According to research from Experian, when the home buyers who were surveyed checked their
credit 18% found their score was lower than expected. The good news is that there are ways
to improve a low score:

  • Pay more than your minimum payments on credit cards
  •  Bring your overdraft down
  • Close unused credit accounts
  • Register for the electoral roll

Happily, 54% of those surveyed found their score was higher than expected and 25% were surprised
by their score. Given that 43% of people haven’t checked their credit score it may be that many are unaware of the impact it may have until they come to apply for a mortgage.

If you’re a first-time buyer looking for a mortgage or a homeowner looking to remortgage, please get in touch to see how we can help find the right mortgage for your circumstances.

Your home/property may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

conveyancing

How to choose a good conveyancer

Conveyancing is an important part of the home buying process, and it’s important to note it’s required when both buying and selling a property.

So what should you consider when choosing a property solicitor to carry out your conveyancing? It’s important to use a qualified property solicitor who’ll be able to take care of a range of issues on your behalf, including:

fixed rate mortgage

Thinking of fixing your mortgage?

Thinking of fixing your mortgage?

If you think an increase in your mortgage repayments could have a negative impact on your lifestyle or financial wellbeing, you may want to consider fixing your mortgage.

With a fixed rate mortgage, your payments are set at a certain level for an agreed period, regardless of whether your lender changes its Standard Variable Rate (SVR). Such an increase typically occurs when the Bank of England Base Rate starts to climb.

Fixed rate mortgages can offer protection from rate rises for an agreed period, but there are several considerations you’ll need to think about before making your decision.

Predictable repayments – but you won’t benefit from rate cuts
With a tracker mortgage, your monthly payment fluctuates in line with a rate that’s equal to, higher, or lower than a chosen Base Rate (usually the Bank of England Base Rate). The rate charged on the mortgage ‘tracks’ that rate, usually for a set period of two to three years.

Tracker rates might be more appealing if you don’t have a fixed budget and can tolerate higher mortgage payments if rates rise, whilst being able to benefit from reduced monthly mortgage payments if rates go down.

But with a fixed rate mortgage, the rate (and therefore your repayments) will stay the same for an agreed period. A fixed rate mortgage makes budgeting much easier because your payments will not change – even if interest rates go up. However, it also means you won’t benefit if rates go down.

Longer fixed terms will be more expensive

If you choose a fixed rate mortgage, you’ll need to decide how long you want your fixed rate to last. Two-year fixed rate mortgages typically offer the lowest initial interest rate. If you want to fix your interest rate for longer, you will probably pay more
for that longer-term security. This may be worthwhile in return for predictable repayments, or you might choose to take the lower rate for a shorter timeframe if you expect that your financial position will improve by the time the deal ends.

A change in circumstances could cost you
Do you have any known changes on the horizon that will have an impact on your mortgage?

With a fixed rate mortgage, you could face an early repayment charge if you repay all or a certain percentage of the mortgage during the fixed rate period.

If you have no known changes and want to benefit from a longer period of security, then a longer term fixed rate of five years may appeal. It might cost more initially, but you’ll benefit from knowing that your budget is fixed for that period.

Your home/property may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

Don’t be drawn into trying to second guess what will happen with interest rates over the coming years. We can help you come to the most appropriate decision for your next mortgage.

Mortgages

The ninth largest lender

The ninth largest lender

34% of first-time buyers relied on their parents for financial help, making the bank of mum and dad’, the equivalent of the UK’s ninth largest lender in 2017.

If you’re trying to get on the housing ladder, you’ll know how hard it can be
• The average price of a first home is over £200,000 in the UK (and £400,000 in London)
• The average first-time buyer deposit has more than doubled over the past decade from £15,168 in 2006 to £32,321 in 2016
• Only 29% of all first-time buyer purchases in 2016 were below the £125,000 Stamp Duty threshold.
• 28% of all first-time buyers with a mortgage opted for a 30 to 35 year mortgage term (in 2016)

With numbers like those left it’s little wonder that so many first-time buyers turned to their parents for financial support in helping them buy their first home. In fact, according to a recent report from Legal and General, the bank of mum and dad could lend more than £6.5bn in 2017, a massive 30% increase on 2016.

The money will help to buy £75bn worth of property and puts parents on a par with the UK’s ninth largest mortgage lender, the Yorkshire Building Society.

Is parental support sustainable?
The bank of mum and dad makes an average financial contribution of £21,600 for each property. And of the buyers who received support from their family, 57% received it in the form of a gift while just 5% were given the money as a loan with interest.

According to Legal and General a loan by the bank of mum and dad could wipe out just over half of a family’s available net wealth, raising the question of whether this type of support is sustainable over the longer term.

Your home/property may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

If you’re looking to buy your first house with help from your family, we can help you find an appropriate mortgage deal for you.

If you’re still in the process of saving your deposit (typically 16% of the value of an average first home), we can help you explore the different ways to invest for your near, mid and long-term plans.

First Time Buyers

Buying for the first time

Buying for the first time?

For first time buyers, getting onto the property ladder may seem like a daunting process, but there is help available.

With demand outstripping supply in many areas, the average UK house price has been pushed beyond the reach of many of the UK’s estimated 335,750 first time buyers. A report from The Land Registry (based on data from November 2016) shows an annual price increase of 6.7%, taking the value of the average UK property to £217,928.

When you consider that first-time buyers would typically put down around 20% against their first home, it’s no wonder that finding a sufficient deposit is becoming increasingly difficult – especially for those currently renting. In fact, one of the major lenders reported the average first-time deposit has more than doubled since 2007 to more than £32,000.

If you’re struggling to save a large deposit you may be able to find a mortgage rate of 90% or 95% – provided you can meet the lender’s affordability criteria.

The bank of mum and dad
Meanwhile research by the Social Mobility Commission has found an increasing proportion are turning to their parents for help buying their first home. In fact, over a third of first-time buyers in England (34%) are relying on the bank of mum and dad, compared to one in five in 2010.

The ‘bank of mum and dad’ has been a useful financial foot-up for many, but what about parents who want to help their kids but don’t have savings?

Government help
Although the Help to Buy: mortgage guarantee scheme ended in December 2016 the Help to Buy: Equity Loan is still available. The Government lends you up to 20% of the cost of your newly-built home, so you’ll only need a 5% cash deposit and a 75% mortgage to make up the rest. Equity loans are available to first time buyers as well as homeowners looking to move. The home you want to buy must be newly built with a maximum price tag of £600,000.

Other initiatives to help first-time buyers include The Help to Buy: ISA which helps you boost your savings by 25%. For every £200 you save you receive a government bonus of £50. The maximum government bonus you can receive is £3,000.

Sound mortgage advice can take the complexities out of the home-buying process and maximise your chances of getting an affordable mortgage.

At a glance:
335,750 first time buyers in the UK
x2 first-time buyer deposits doubled since 2007
34% of first time buyers rely on parents
£217,928 average value of a UK property

If you need help getting onto the property ladder please get in touch

Your home/property may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage

downsizing your home

Parent landlords

Parent landlords

With house prices rising faster than salaries, the younger generation face having to find a much bigger multiple of their income to buy a home, compared to their baby-boomer parents.

Couple this with rising rent payments that stifle the ability to raise a deposit and you can see why ‘Generation Rent’ is a growing population and more kids are looking to their parents for help.

Parent landlords
In the UK, 730,000 parents rent properties to their children and a further 1.4m landlords have said they would be willing to take their children as tenants.

As both the cost of renting and buying a property increases, renting from a parent should help prospective first-time buyers get on the property ladder sooner rather than later. Especially given that just 5% of parents charge the market rate, 30% allow their children to pay whatever they can afford and 12% even go so far as to pay the bills for the property.

Buy to Let
If you have a property you’re considering renting to your children, or you’re thinking of Buying to Let to help out your kids, make sure you consider all the costs involved before you take the leap.

Solicitors, valuers and surveyors are not regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

[gem_quote style=”5″]If you need mortgage advice, or you’re looking to help your children onto the property ladder, please talk to us.[/gem_quote]